Posted on: December 5, 2019 By: Sage Tourigny

What is Fixed Wireless?

Fixed wireless is a technology used to provide connectivity over a specified range without the need to install any wires and is usually connected building to building or tower to building with a microwave radio link.

Top 10 Myths of Fixed Wireless

  1. Fixed wireless is the same as LTE
    The Reality: Fixed wireless is more reliable than LTE
    • LTE provides best-effort shared connectivity for mobile devices.
    • Fixed wireless provides guaranteed dedicated, last-mile connections for business customer sites with availability, latency and packet loss service level agreements (SLAs).
  1. Fixed wireless is less reliable than other connectivity methods
    The Reality: Fixed wireless is on par with fibre access
    • Fixed wireless provides a carrier-grade service and offers the same network availability (99.9%) and Mean Time To Repair (4-hr MTTR) as fibre.
    • Because it is delivered from the rooftop, fixed wireless access offers a truly redundant access into buildings and is frequently combined with redundant fibre access to create high availability connectivity solutions.
  1. It is like broadband/best effort/no SLA
    The Reality: Fixed wireless is superior to broadband and DSL
    • Unlike broadband, it boasts fibre-like SLAs.
    • Fixed wireless is a fully reliable business-grade connectivity service ideal for mission-critical applications compared to broadband which is a best effort connectivity service supporting consumer and business traffic.
  1. Fixed wireless is impeded by weather
    The Reality: Fixed wireless is engineered to deliver carrier-grade service through the worst expected weather with 99.9% uptime similar to fibre.
    .
  2. Fixed wireless is not secure
    The Reality: Fixed wireless is highly secure
    • Radios transmit signals into the “air,” the perception can be that anyone could receive and possibly “steal” or “listen to” someone’s data. Fixed wireless radios offer a very robust framework featuring a variety of security related countermeasures:
    • The transmission system of the radio units is proprietary, and thus inherently more secure than the commonly used open standards radio equipment.
    • The data traffic destined to the Subscriber radio unit is assembled in proprietary framing structures, encrypted and sent to the receiving radio according to a proprietary radio exchange mechanism. The data remains encoded until it is received and disassembled by the recipient radio at the customer’s end.
  1. Fixed wireless is the same as satellite
    The Reality: Fixed wireless is less expensive and provides better latency than satellite connectivity
    • Fixed wireless access provides unlimited data throughput – there are no overage or usage charges.
    • Unlike satellite connections that can add 1-2 seconds of latency to a connection, Fixed wireless access will have a latency similar to a fibre connection (e.g., 10ms).
  1. Fixed wireless is slow
    The Reality: Fixed wireless can achieve dedicated and symmetrical gigabit connection speeds
    • Customers are routinely surprised to see fixed wireless achieve speeds far greater than cable and DSL, especially with regard to upload speeds.
  1. Fixed wireless is complex to install
    The Reality: Fixed wireless access offers fast and flexible deployments
    • Fixed wireless is faster to deploy than fibre as it does not require trenching and construction.
    • Can be easily deployed into underserviced or new areas (e.g, construction sites).
    • Typical installation timelines range from 21 to 45 business days.
  1. Fixed wireless is based on usage
    The Reality: Fixed wireless mostly provides unlimited data throughput for a fixed monthly charge.
  1. Fixed wireless only works for rural areas
    The Reality: Fixed wireless works well in both urban and rural environments.
    • In underserved rural areas, fixed wireless offers businesses high-speed, carrier-grade connectivity.
    • In built-up areas, fixed wireless offers flexible, easy to install connections without the need for costly, time consuming street-level construction.

 

To learn more about fixed wireless, visit https://go.terago.ca/contact/TeraGo

 

Posted on: December 2, 2019 By: Sage Tourigny

Written by: Erik Nordquist

With payment-card details and personal data remaining a lucrative cash cow for cyber criminals on the dark web, retailers are firmly on criminals’ radar these days. E-commerce and business-to-business (B2B) transactions are the norm for most shops, which opens up a big digital avenue straight into the heart of the business for capturing card information and personally identifiable information (PII) including names, addresses, shopping preferences, and loyalty program information. Exacerbating matters is the fact that retail tends to be a vertical that falls behind on the security front – something that cyber criminals are well aware of.

All of this means that if you’re in charge of a company in the retail space, you need to make cybersecurity a priority. In case it’s not already, here are eight stats to think about as you plan strategic decisions going forward.

1.Retailers are top targets for cyber criminals.

According to a recent Alert Logic cybersecurity report, retailers topped the list of cyberattack targets out of eight different types of organizations (4,000 organizations in total). Alert Logic’s analysis of the attacks in this vertical revealed aggressive scanning, including indicators of extensive directory-guessing techniques and a large array of automated code injection and vulnerability scanning. Application attacks, where hackers infiltrate a victim company’s mission-critical services in order to capture the information flowing to and from them, are by far the dominant attack type in this industry group, accounting for 85 percent of all attacks.

2. Retailers lack social-engineering awareness.

The retail industry ranks dead last in foiling social-engineering efforts, where cyber criminals pose as a legitimate correspondent in an email to get an employee to click on a malicious link or open a weaponized attachment. According to the 2018 SecurityScorecard Retail Cybersecurity Report, since the retail industry employs younger, less experienced people at a higher rate than other industries, these employees may be less aware of these attack vectors.

3. Most retailers miss the mark on PCI compliance.

Also, according to SecurityScorecard, more than 90 percent of retailers are out of compliance with the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS). PCI DSS is a standard for those that handle credit and debit card transactions. It’s mandated by law, requiring steps such as maintaining a firewall around customer data, practicing good hygiene when it comes to account passwords, and so on. Penalties for non-compliance are as high as $100,000 every month or $500,000 per security incident.

4. Retailers fall behind on encryption for data in the cloud.

According to the retail edition of the “2018 Thales Data Threat Report,” despite being among the primary adopters of cloud storage for company and customer information, retailers tend to put encryption for the data they keep in the cloud on the back burner. Only 26 percent of U.S. retailers are implementing encryption in the cloud today.

5. Data breaches are accelerating.

The Thales report also revealed that half of U.S. retailers experienced a data breach in the past year, up from 19 percent the year before. Further, a full 75 percent of retailers have experienced at least one data breach in the past.

6. Retailers see data theft as the biggest challenge this year.

According to the SecurityScorecard report, eight in 10 retailers think that their biggest IT challenge for 2019 is combatting data theft. And no wonder: a majority (79 percent) of those hit with an incident in 2018 said they lost customers, while 62 percent admitted to incurring legal costs.

7. Breaches impact customer loyalty.

According to a study by KPMG, a fifth (19 percent) of consumers would take their retail business elsewhere after a breach, and 33 percent would take a break from shopping at a store for an extended period. Examples of 16 retailers that have been affected by data breaches since January 2017 can be found here.

8. Security spending is on the rise.

The good news is that many retailers seem to be waking up to the cyber-dangers out there and the implications of a break or attack. According to the Thales study, 84 percent of U.S. retailers plan to increase their security spending in the next year.

The bottom line is that cybersecurity trends are growing worse for retailers in terms of the volume and success rate of attacks. This, combined with a lack of awareness and poor security posture within the vertical, makes retail an attractive target for information thieves. All too often, retail locations don’t have in-house expertise, which can be an obstacle for security preparedness.

The good news is that a growing number of retailers are increasing their use of managed security services  to fill the gaps in personnel and budgetary resources. For example, TPx has a full range of state-of-the-art protections and mitigation services, all offered on a cost-effective, managed basis. Call your TPx representative today to find out how we can help your retail business navigate the always-evolving threat landscape.

 

About the Author

Erik Nordquist is the Senior Product Manager for TPx Communications’ managed security services. He’s led a broad range of critical activities, including Field Operations and the Hostmaster team where he built TPx’s anycast DNS network to service its 55,000 customer locations. His work on the Network Integrity team made him the resident expert for mitigating Denial of Service (DoS) attacks. After interfacing with customers for years, Erik is bringing his customer-focused approach to his Product Manager role, helping to deliver first-in-class security services to TPx clients with unsurpassed customer support.

Posted on: November 14, 2019 By: Sage Tourigny

By: Casey O’Loughlin

Your communications system is a direct gateway to your customers. Your phones, email, fax system, and everything in between, are all access points into your business. As such, it’s vital to make sure they are equipped with the latest safeguards in order to keep bad actors out of your enterprise and away from your customers’ sensitive data.

Related: How To Ensure UC Security

Research, after all, shows that hackers now attack once every 39 seconds. And in 2020, the average cost of a data breach will exceed $150 million. Cyber crime is getting worse with each passing year, and it’s not going to improve in 2020. In fact, cyber crime is evolving, as hackers are looking for ways to leverage next-generation technologies like artificial intelligence as a means of attacking corporate networks. We could start seeing attacks that are much more sophisticated, and dangerous.

Secure Communications In 5 Steps

So, what can you do to protect your communications endpoints? Here is a checklist that you can use to help reduce the likelihood of an attack:

1. Security and Information Event Management (SIEM)

If you are running a global enterprise with multiple contact centers and thousands of remote agents, it’s vital to set up a SIEM system to detect and eliminate suspicious activity. A SIEM system will be able to identify a potential intruder by their location and credentials.

Related: Top 6 Ways To Maintain Secure Communications

For example, if someone tries to log into a backend customer database after hours from a country where you don’t typically do business, advanced security controls can be triggered to investigate the issue and restrict access. A SIEM system can act as your ears and eyes across a global network.

2. Regular Penetration Testing

Hackers are constantly looking for vulnerabilities that they can exploit to gain entrance into your network. If your business doesn’t find these vulnerabilities first, you can assume that hackers will. The way to identify such vulnerabilities is by performing penetration testing, which can be done either automatically or manually. Ideally, you should have an automated system in place and a team of trained cybersecurity experts working to locate weak points.

Related: How To Bring Next-Level Security & Compliance To Your Office

3. SD-WAN

Global networks will utilize many different connections, from numerous potentially insecure sources. Software-defined wide area networking (SD-WAN) can provide encrypted connectivity, securing traffic while it is in transit. SD-WAN can also provide improved visibility and centralized management for IT administrators, empowering them to make changes to a global WAN from a single location.

Related: How SD-WAN & UC Benefit Your Business

4. Regulatory Compliance

Many organizations need to go above and beyond to protect their systems and data. Healthcare agencies, for instance, must follow the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). Government agencies must buy from General Services Administration (GSA) certified vendors. And companies doing business in Europe must follow the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). IT administrators in highly regulated industries are strongly encouraged to buy from vendors with a proven ability to maintain compliance.

Related: 3 More Ways To Maintain Secure Communications

5. Unified Communications

Companies typically embrace unified communications (UC) because it helps them improve productivity and reduce costs. But did you know there’s a security advantage to using this software, too? Without UC, businesses are left using disparate phones, fax machines, email systems, databases, and more. This often leads to shadow IT, where administrators may lose track of the systems that are being used across an enterprise. As a result, security issues can arise outside of the scope of IT. With UC, however, IT administrators can drastically reduce shadow IT, secure sensitive data, and maintain monitored databases instead of leaving data in various unauthorized locations.

Related: Sales Tips To Help You Dominate The Final Months Of 2019

Posted on: October 18, 2019 By: Carolyn Kuczynski

The Difference Between Managed Mobility Services and Mobile Device Management

 

Mobile device usage in business continues to be a growth market. And as that usage continues to grow, so too do business challenges that center around effective mobility management. How does a business ensure device security? How does it know that it’s getting the most cost-effective pricing from its mobile device carriers? And how does it cope with the added strains imposed on IT departments required to support the growing number of mobile devices?

The situation that confronts a business with growing mobile device usage is that these questions need to be addressed in order for their mobility initiatives to be cost-effective – but with little experience in mobility management, pulling all of the necessary management and support together can be extremely challenging. The solution for a business plagued with these challenges is very often to turn to an experienced third-party provider of managed mobility services (MMS) and mobile device management (MDM).

But finding a qualified provider can pose its own challenges to a business not familiar with the mobility landscape – including understanding, in the first instance, what it is they need to look for, as well as the vocabulary needed to understand the different solutions on offer from various providers.

With that in mind, we offer this look at exactly what MMS and MDM are, and how they differ from each other.

Managed Mobility Services (MMS)

Managed mobility services are concerned with managing the entire lifecycle of a company’s mobile device fleet, and have a somewhat (but not exclusively) account-based focus. At Wireless Watchdogs, for example, we can be involved with a company before the first device is ever purchased, helping them to understand what their needs and goals are and then helping them to create the policies needed to achieve those goals. We then help with the procurement, provision, and deployment of the devices they need, as well as act on their behalf as an authorized agent to the mobile carriers in order to ensure that they get the best structure and pricing available.

Once the mobile accounts are set up and the devices in place, we then provide continual monitoring in order to achieve two basic goals: That the company’s policies are adhered to, and that the accounts for those devices are always optimal in terms of price. In order to do that, we provide real-time analytics and reporting to our customers so that decision-makers always have the information they need to make informed decisions. They are the same analytics and reports that we use as we manage the accounts to ensure continual cost efficiency, and guarantee synchronicity between a company, its policies and goals, and our MMS efforts on their behalf.

As part of managing the entire device lifecycle, there’s another important service that is provided in order to optimize our customers’ mobility initiatives: Ongoing Help Desk support.

The Help Desk support is a key MMS feature because it removes the burden from a customer’s internal IT staff of having to support a potentially large number of mobile devices. Because the IT department is unlikely to be expert at supporting the mobile devices in use, supporting the devices themselves can chew up large amounts of time and resources. Further, IT departments are typically staffed and funded to support a company’s IT infrastructure, not its new mobile devices, leading to a vicious cycle whereby support all across the board suffers. By including Help Desk support as a part of mobility management services, we remove those burdens and costs from internal IT departments. It’s a win for both the IT department and the device users themselves.

Just as with ongoing Help Desk support, making sure that all mobile devices are always patched and updated is likewise an important aspect of managed mobility services. Keeping devices up to date is important in ensuring that they are always functioning as intended. But it’s especially important for securing devices– and thus, potentially, a business’s network and data – against hacking and malware attacks directed at vulnerabilities known in unpatched devices. And again, ensuring that updates reach all mobile devices could potentially place undue burdens on a company’s internal IT staff. By handing this responsibility off as part of ongoing MMS, companies again save time and money – and are more secure in the bargain.

And finally, because MMS should cover the entire device lifecycle, a device’s end of life is also an important part of those services. Our approach to device end of life as part of our managed mobility services includes ensuring that lost, stolen, or retired devices are no longer able to access networks – an important part of keeping data safe. To further ensure security, we also perform pre-recycle factory resets on retired devices, wiping them of any potentially sensitive data and applications.

Mobile Device Management (MDM)

As you will have gathered, managed mobility services must necessarily have some connection to the devices themselves – but in the bigger picture, MMS is about the lifecycle as a whole.

Mobile Device Management (MDM), on the other hand, directly involves the devices themselves. MDM is typically client-server software; the MDM server is centralized and controlled by administrators, while the mobile devices are provisioned with MDM agent software – the client.

Because the MDM software sits on the device, it offers capabilities that MMS in and of itself doesn’t provide. The details vary by the particular MDM software, of course, but typically they provide enhanced security of the device itself. MDM software may, for example, allow for a device to be partitioned into personal-use and business-use silos. Partitioning a device in this manner prevents users from sharing company data on their personal accounts – and likewise prevents a user’s personal data from being shared to the company network.

Access management and identity management – and thus corporate network authentication and access – are also readily controlled through MDM software. And because proper access management is readily achievable, other features can safely be provided to end users. For example, secure file synching and sharing is an important tool with many business use cases – and is readily achievable via MDM software.

Finally, the client-server nature of MDM software allows administrators to have granular control of devices and users across their network. This is especially important in mobile deployments where different users have need of different levels of access to the company network and its resources, because it can ensure that the right users have the right access at the right time – simultaneously increasing efficiency and security.

The Sum is Greater than Its Parts

Thus, MMS is process-centric, while MDM is device-centric. It’s entirely possible to have MMS without MDM software. Likewise, some companies will choose to do an MDM implementation on their own without any other managed mobility services. But the true potential power of MMS and MDM – decreasing costs while simultaneously increasing security – is only fully unlocked when MDM software is an integrated part of managed mobility services.

At Wireless Watchdogs, we’re happy to talk with you further about the various features of both MMS and MDM. You can request a demo of our platform at any time, and see for yourself the kinds of insights that our analytics and reporting can provide.

We also offer a free, no-obligation audit of your wireless accounts. You provide us your cellular bills for the last three months, and we’ll input them into our system and then show you – again, at no cost to you – how you could be saving money every month through our managed mobility services. The savings are real – tens of thousands of dollars a month, for some of our clients. To get started and see where you could be saving, request your free audit here:

REQUEST YOUR FREE AUDIT

Posted on: October 15, 2019 By: Carolyn Kuczynski

Our bring your own network (BYON), access-agnostic solutions equip your customers to easily swap phone systems and migrate to the latest communications and networking technologies they need while keeping their underlying connectivity in place. Cloud-based Unified Communications as a Service (UCaaS), value-added SD-WAN and managed security services will improve customer engagement, employee productivity, network performance, service reliability and cyberthreat protection.

Featured BYON Windstream Enterprise solutions include:

  • SD-WAN – Choose the technology platform that is right for your business from two of the leading WAN edge infrastructure providers— VeloCloud or Fortinet—both options are recognized as leaders in Gartner’s Magic Quadrant, provide PCI DSS compliance, and leverage our state-of-the-art partner portal
  • UCaaS – Our many “flavors” of Unified Communications as a Service offer a more connected, collaborative workforce, with instant messaging, chat, presence, mobility, conferencing and CRM integrations—all backed by a world-class network with 99.99% always-on reliability
  • Security and Compliance – Most experts agree that a security breach for most companies is no longer a question of if it will happen, but when it will happen. Our suite of Security Services includes Cloud and CPE Firewalls, SIEM and DDoS Mitigation to shield the most sophisticated threats.

Enjoy big payouts. In addition to our standard competitive residual monthly compensation, we’ll give you a 5% bonus residual and up to 4X accelerator for BYON services!

 Everything you need from a single source. If you’re also looking for network solutions, either as a replacement or for diversity, we can do it all—BYON, network solutions or both.

Want to Learn more? E-mail Windstream Enterprise

Posted on: October 11, 2019 By: Carolyn Kuczynski

If you run a small- to medium-sized business (SMB), chances are that you’re already aware that cybersecurity should be a concern. In fact, a recent survey from AppRiver found that more than half (58%) of SMBs in the U.S. are more worried about getting hacked than they are about a flood, a fire, a transit strike, or even a physical break-in of their offices.

The question is, what are you going to do about it? Staying secure on a budget can be a challenge for SMBs – a problem that’s often exacerbated by a lack of in-house security expertise. Turning to cost-effective managed services is a good solution – but there are also plenty of tactics that you can implement to minimize your risk.

Understand the Hacker Tricks of the Trade

Cyberattackers are savvy and adaptable, but there are a few common techniques that they use on a regular basis. Understanding what these are can help you protect your business.

Far and away, the most common way an attacker infiltrates networks and harvests sensitive data is through phishing.

Phishing works like this: A victim will receive an email claiming to be from someone they know, or from an organization they recognize or perhaps even deal with often. These emails sometimes clearly stand out as spam, but in other cases, the impersonation will be hard to spot: the adversary will take great pains to make it look and sound like a legitimate email, complete with authentic-looking logos.

Within that phishing email will be a malicious link, attached document, or an app. When a user clicks on a link, it will take them to what looks like a legitimate page with a log-in screen. That page is actually fake (or “spoofed”), and when the victim puts in his or her credentials, the hacker is able to grab them and gain unauthorized access to the victim’s account. In the case of an attachment or app, opening it usually results in malware being installed on the victim’s machine. That virus or a trojan gives hackers access to the data on the victim’s computer or phone (for instance, it could be a keylogger, which captures what the victim types to uncover user names and passwords), and also allows them to gain a foothold on the company network.

There are also watering-hole attacks to worry about. Here, an attacker might create a fake website that offers information that a specific target might be interested in – industry-specific articles or “how-to” blogs, for instance – while in the background it is executing malware on the visitor’s computer. In a variation of this, adversaries create fake mobile apps that appear to do something useful; but when installed, they turn out to be malware.

A third common attack method is via malicious Wi-Fi networks in public places. A hacker can use software to set up a wireless access point (with an innocuous or attractive name like “free public Wi-Fi”) – and once someone has connected to it, a hacker can intercept and eavesdrop on any traffic that flows through it.

There are other techniques out there as well, but these are common tricks to watch out for.

Employee Training: A Crucial Line of Defense

All three of these attack types require the user to take some kind of action – click on a link, download an attachment, visit a dodgy website, download a rogue app, or connect to an untrusted Wi-Fi network. And that means that the attacks can be prevented with good security hygiene.

Training your employees is a critical first line of defense against these opportunistic kinds of attacks. For starters, implement the doctrine of verification: Before clicking on a link or downloading an attachment in an email, send a separate email to the supposed sender to make sure the person did indeed send the message – especially for anything unsolicited. Better yet, pick up the phone and call the person.

Another training tactic is to learn to always hover over a link to make sure it’s the legitimate address. Malicious links won’t have the proper URL – however, they may have similar-sounding URLs. If the message claims to be from the Bank of Peter, the malicious link may read something like www.bankof.peter.com or www.bankofpeeter.com instead of www.bankofpeter.com.

In a similar vein, employees should be trained to never download an app from a third-party app store. Even if they do download something from Google Play or the Apple App Store, advise them to read the reviews to make sure all is on the up-and-up; sometimes bad apps do get through.

And finally, on-the-go employees should be wary of public Wi-Fi, and should always verify the legitimate SSID with the airport, café, or other operator of the space. It’s also a good idea to use a VPN – there are plenty of free offerings.

Require Best Practices

Along with basic security training, SMBs should always ensure that best practices are being carried out. For instance, all software should be kept up-to-date. Most of the time, a malicious attachment or watering-hole attack will only be successful if there are unpatched software vulnerabilities on the target machines.

For any cloud services, employees should be required to enable two-factor authentication (2FA), which will make it necessary to enter a one-time password that’s sent to a mobile phone before the user can log in. That way, even if hackers somehow gain a user’s credentials, they still won’t be able to log in because they don’t have access to that user’s mobile device.

Speaking of which, password hygiene is critical as well. Businesses should be thinking about complex passwords which include a combination of letters, numbers, and special characters. SMBs should require that their users change these often, are unique and not used anywhere else. In a similar vein, users should make sure that their website security questions are difficult – not information that could be gleaned from social media or elsewhere, such as your mother’s maiden name or the city where you were born – and consider making up the answers to thwart hackers even further.

Simple Administrative Fixes

Beyond user actions, there are simple actions that SMB network administrators can take to help their companies get out of the “low-hanging fruit” camp. Most hackers are looking for an easy score. Anything that raises the bar of effort for them – even a little bit – will cause them to move onto the next potential victim rather than expend any more time and effort on something that isn’t easy.

To start, enable firewalls and traffic encryption – you can easily enable the basic tools that come with your networking gear. Secondly, make sure that all default passwords on devices connected to the network are changed to unique combinations, and keep the software and firmware up-to-date. Next, replace any systems with outdated operating systems like Windows 7 – Microsoft no longer supports these, and there are known vulnerabilities that hackers can easily exploit to gain access.

And finally, think about permissions. Take steps to manage and limit access to data, drives, and systems for those employees that don’t need it. Also, don’t forget to deactivate access for those who don’t need it anymore – ex-employees are a leading cause of data theft.

The bottom line: as a small business, you are a primary target for hackers. Make time for these easy steps today to avoid difficult situations in the future. Need help securing your business or want to learn more? Visit www.tpx.com/managedIT or call 888-407-9594.

About the Author

Erik Nordquist is the Senior Product Manager for TPx Communications’ managed security services. He’s led a broad range of critical activities, including Field Operations and the Hostmaster team where he built TPx’s anycast DNS network to service its 55,000 customer locations. His work on the Network Integrity team made him the resident expert for mitigating Denial of Service (DoS) attacks. After interfacing with customers for years, Erik is bringing his customer-focused approach to his Product Manager role, helping to deliver first-in-class security services to TPx clients with unsurpassed customer support.

Posted on: By: Carolyn Kuczynski

Yes! It’s a Match Made in Heaven!

SD-WAN has been a trending topic in the technology world for quite a while now, and long enough that it’s beginning to become commonplace in network discussions and more routine when it comes deployments.

Today, most SD-WAN deployments are managed by companies that exclusively handle  SD-WAN. So any voice provider that planned to sell SD-WAN as a part of their solution to a customer would essentially be relying on these third-parties or outsourcing to manage the SD-WAN service.

That’s why Momentum recently made headlines when they added SD-WAN to the company’s solution portfolio.

Although unique, a voice and communications provider offering a managed SD-WAN solution brings a number of advantages to every deployment. Here  are a few:

1) The Benefit of the UCaaS Experience

VoIP and unified communications are a few of the primary applications that use an SD-WAN connection. So while traditional SD-WAN providers may be concerned with general deployment, connection speeds, etc., voice and communications providers are able to approach SD-WAN configurations and designs with a firmer understanding of the application requirements and end goal.

This allows voice providers to optimize and lay out an SD-WAN blueprint and delivery plan for customers that ensures each and every deployment gets maximum results for their voice, UCaaS and all other applications.

2) Access to More Advanced Technology and Integrations

Because SD-WAN providers deal exclusively with that technology, they don’t always have the access or the capability of integrating into all the latest pieces of technology. This especially happens at the individual application level where you’ll see handshake deals or head nod agreements on how particular services and applications will perform on the connection.

Voice and communication providers have the experience, understanding and partnerships to combine cutting-edge branches of technology to deliver the absolute best delivery to work with applications

For instance, Momentum has designed a way to deploy SD-WAN in a way that builds on the technology’s enhanced availability, visibility and control without having to sacrifice security and reliability. One way this is accomplished is through the option of placing a virtual session border controller in Momentum’s data centers to ensure peak performance and quality.

Additionally, Momentum’s SD-WAN deployments can leverage both wired and wireless bandwidth. This is a game-changer because the expansion of available connection options allows for deployments to truly find and use the best available bandwidth. It also means the solution isn’t limited to locations with wired connections so it can be used almost anywhere.

3) Streamlined Experience

At the end of the day, one of the biggest benefits of having managed SD-WAN from a voice provider is the customer experience. You can see this in getting a single bill for multiple services, receiving access to savings through using multiple services and having main a single point of contact for questions and troubleshooting. Also, a voice and communication provider delivering SD-WAN can actually also provide even tighter protective security because all transmissions and signals remain in a single network.

SD-WAN from voice and communication providers delivers expertise,  enhanced technology, a better experience and move financial value to customers. And if the provider is like Momentum and provides a white-glove experience, having a single provider for voice, SD-WAN and even possibly other network services can give deliver additional meaningful value that simply can’t be ignored.

Posted on: October 10, 2019 By: Carolyn Kuczynski

Webinar – Wednesday, October 30, 2019 @ 1 pm ET

To optimize the inherent benefits of the cloud, a growing number of enterprise businesses are adopting cloud native approaches – including containers, microservices, Kubernetes, and serverless architectures – for both new application development and legacy production applications. However, while the cloud native trend is growing, several roadblocks are impeding the enterprise’s path to successful adoption.

In this live webinar event hosted by CNSG Platinum Supplier Expedient, William Fellows, VP, Research & Co-Founder of 451 Research, and Expedient’s Chief Innovation Officer, John White, will provide an overview of the cloud native market landscape, discuss challenges and opportunities, and look at two real-world enterprise examples of cloud native in action. Reserve your spot today!

 Attendees of this webinar will learn about:

  • Trends in cloud native adoption and the push to re-platform legacy applications
  • The benefits of cloud native for enterprise businesses
  • How cloud native helps both corporate IT and DevOps
  • Infrastructure options for cloud native deployment
  • Real-world cloud native use cases

Who should attend?

CTOs, CIOs, CISOs, VPs of IT, IT Directors, IT managers, IT administrators, Cloud Architects, DevOps Engineers

 Webinar Registration

http://bit.ly/2ovT3g5

Posted on: October 8, 2019 By: Carolyn Kuczynski

By Chris Betz, Chief Security Officer, CenturyLink

Let me put it another way: Security can be complex. The true art is making security easy to use.

As a Fortune 150 company and the second largest U.S. communications provider to global enterprise customers, we are responsible for securing our own operations through a suite of hybrid IT, cloud, networking and communications solutions — in addition to those of our customers. As CSO for this company, I can attest to the fact that the pressures security leaders face today are many.

On one hand, we have the explosion of network traffic spurred by video, 5G, IoT, connected devices and a mobile workforce; on the other, we have a justified and growing intolerance by users — both internal and external — for anything less than always-on, flawless performance. Couple this with the patchwork nature of many of today’s security solutions, which businesses are often left to stitch together on their own; the gap between security and engineering teams that often reflects security as an afterthought; and the shortage of qualified security professionals — and the picture can seem bleak.

But security can be simple: We believe that the inherent value of a security solutions provider should first and foremost be effective simplicity.

At CenturyLink, our security builds on two fundamental directives: to leverage our expansive global threat visibility and to act against the threats we see. Our unique and deep network-based threat intelligence makes our approach possible — and it is the foundation of Connected Security, our vision for seamless integration between security and the network to transform the communications of tomorrow.

The more we can do as a global security services provider to identify or impact malicious traffic before it hits our customers’ infrastructure, the better customers can focus and prioritize their resources elsewhere. This is the promise of Connected Security and the premise upon which we have transformed our network into a threat sensor and proactive defense platform.

Disrupting the security threats that we face today — and the threats we will face tomorrow — requires more than intelligence. It requires a collective commitment to share what we see and to act on what we know. We look forward to continuing to work together as we drive toward simplifying security.

Click here to view and download the full CenturyLink 2019 Threat Report: https://www.centurylink.com/asset/business/enterprise/report/2019-threat-research-report.pdf

 

October is National Cybersecurity Awareness Month and as a CenturyLink Channel Partner, you have access to sell CenturyLink’s full suite of trusted Security Solutions. For more information, please contact your Channel Manager or Partners@CenturyLink.com.

 

Posted on: October 7, 2019 By: Carolyn Kuczynski

Choosing the right Unified Communications platform

A unified communications (UC) platform should be your ticket to easier team collaboration, with all workflows for instant messaging, video conferencing, screen sharing, VoIP telephony and more running through one streamlined application. Whether it actually becomes this ideal all-in-one hub will hinge on which solution and vendor you select.

What’s at stake when shopping for UC – and why you should explore cloud

When you choose a UC platform, you’re not just purchasing a product – you’re buying into a larger ecosystem, much like you do when you opt for iOS or Android. In addition to placing a bet on the solution’s underlying communications technology – i.e., its ability to handle calls, messages, and meetings – you are also trusting its vendor to support it and other vendors to allow it access to their APIs. That raises the stakes for making an informed decision, as the wrong choice can leave you with a UC solution that is as unreliable for end-users as it is difficult for you to integrate into your larger IT environment.

Making these sorts of high-stakes choices between seemingly similar – but actually quite different – collaboration tools is the enterprise equivalent of the format wars that once dominated consumer tech. For example, imagine being a movie buff circa 2006 and going all-in on the ill-fated HD-DVD instead of Blu-ray. The latter quickly drove the former out of the competition despite their comparable specs, leaving early adopters with an expensive player that studios had abandoned and which couldn’t even play Blu-ray discs – in other words, a major sunk cost.

When it comes to business communication tools, there’s a much wider range of competing solutions, from on-prem UC based on SIP trunking and an existing phone system to cloud-based implementations from vendors including Telesystem. Cloud-based UC, which is low-cost and continuously updated, is generally the most reliable platform for sustaining growth and ensuring real-time communications, not to mention eliminating the risk of ever being saddled with expensive, low-utility assets down the road.

That said, it’s important to scrutinize the features of any unified communications platform as well as the specific value the vendor can add to it. Let’s look at what you should prioritize during the selection process.

Deployment model: Cloud, hybrid or on-premises

All UC solutions are designed to perform the same basic task, namely to create a one-stop-shop for:

  • Voice calls.
  • HD video conferences.
  • Instant messages.
  • Virtual meetings.

At the same time, they differ in the specific infrastructure they harness to reach this goal. An on-prem unified communications platform is built on equipment the customer owns, operates and maintains. In contrast, cloud UC – or Unified Communications-as-a-Service (UCaaS) – leverages the power of the provider’s data centers and hosted IT resources, and hybrid blends the two.

There are pros and cons to each approach. On-prem and hybrid afford a higher degree of control, at the cost of budgetary and operational flexibility. Cloud offers the latter two in spades but requires finding a trustworthy vendor. For now, cloud UC seems to be winning the race, with a Synergy Research report finding its adoption among enterprises increasing a staggering 57% year-over-year in 2018.

A UCaaS platform like UC-One from Telesystem can completely replace your existing PBX without requiring you to handle its maintenance or perform the complex operations for moving, adding or changing the system’s users. Cloud-based unified communications are highly scalable, flexible and cost-effective, as they are billed as periodic operating expenditures, not as steep upfront capital expenditures.

Features for calling, messaging and meetings

Any UC solution worth its weight will do much more than simply be a PBX-in-the-sky, though. It will support all of the key functions integral to modern teamwork and put them into context in one place, eliminating the need to waste so much time on app switching just to keep up with the many possible ways in which a team can interact.

Indeed, today’s workplaces are home to a plethora of collaboration tools, including persistent chat apps, VoIP and video services for real-time communications, online meeting spaces and old standbys such as email, PSTN calls and text messages. The latter remains particularly popular despite the rise of newer alternatives; a survey by Technalysis Research found that they accounted for 75% of all co-worker communication.

Unified communications platforms like UC-One effortlessly balance old and new modes of communication:

Calling

Need to make a quick phone call? Corporate directory lookup allows colleagues to be found within seconds. You can also set up a single number for all of your devices, use Wi-Fi calling for cheaper rates and make VoIP or conventional calls from your business number. HD video is available as well to enrich voice conversations.

Unified messaging

Business messaging has come a long way from the early days of IRC and SMS. Chatting within a UC suite is strengthened by features such as presence (to see who’s online at the moment), private and group chat, full chat history and easy access to all shared content such as emails and other files.

Meetings

Online meetings should be simple to join and participate in, but too often they throw a lot of roadblocks in front of their would-be participants. Dial-ins, PINs and complex user interfaces complicate the experience. Meeting functionality in a platform like UC-One is much more streamlined, with a simple invitation system that gets out of everyone’s way and allows participants to get right down to business via integrated video, messaging and screen sharing. You can even drag and drop a colleague’s icon into the meeting room or, if needed, dial-in.

Support for mobile workers

Since the 2000s, there has been a steady increase in the number of people telecommuting, in large part due to the evolution of mobile devices and wireless networks. More than 4 million individuals work from home at least half the time, according to Global Workplace Analytics. Half of the U.S. workforce holds a position that is compatible with telework arrangements and 80 to 90 percent of workers would like to telecommute at least some of the time.

Accordingly, mobile device support is a must-have in a UC solution. Specific features to look for include:

  • Android and iOS client apps for phones and tablets.
  • The ability to move calls from desktops to mobile devices.
  • Multiple call handling and merging.
  • Business phone number support across devices.
  • Wi-Fi calling with seamless handover between networks.

Integrations with other business communications apps

To return briefly to our earlier point about HD-DVD vs. Blu-ray, ecosystems matter. Cloud UC solutions without deep integrations and reliable vendor support are no better than fancy media formats that have no films or shows that anyone wants to watch.

The best UC platforms build context and support efficient workflows by integrating with everyday tools such as Microsoft Office 365, G Suite, Salesforce, Box and more. Plus, they can pull information and events from calendars and emails. The end result is one view within the UC app that provides a wealth of information about your calls, messages, files and co-worker statuses.

Should you invest in a UC platform?

Upgrading to a unified communications system is a big step, and one worth taking for many businesses. As PBXes age and become costlier to operate and maintain, transitioning to cloud UC, in particular, is often the rational move.

UC technology brings together the core functionality of your phone system with advanced features for messaging and meeting. It also goes beyond a traditional PBX by incorporating better support for mobile devices, which can easily use an existing workplace number to create a more professional impression, especially for small businesses.

Organizations of all sizes and across all verticals can potentially benefit from a UC implementation. Multi-location enterprises are perhaps best positioned since a UC platform provides a common way for geographically dispersed and frequently on-the-go employees to consistently stay in touch.

As an experienced national provider of services including hosted VoIP, network security and dedicated internet access, Telesystem offers a top-notch unified communications experience via the UC-One platform. It’s easy to get started by requesting a quote from our team. You can also contact us directly for additional information on UC-One or any of our other enterprise collaboration tools.